Kidney Stones

Renal or bladder stones are the crystals of such as calcium, oxalate and uric acid. If a kidney stone obstructs in urethra or the ureter, cause hematuria (blood in the urine), constant and severe pain in the back or side, fever, vomiting, or chills. Nephrolithiasis (Kidney stones): Minerals in urine form stones, which may build big enough to block flow of urine. Most kidney stones pass through urine on their own but some kidney stones are too large they cannot pass and should be treated.

Bladder stones are hard masses of minerals in your bladder. Bladder stones create when urine in your bladder gets to be concentrated, bringing about minerals in your urine to take shape. Concentrated, stagnant urine is regularly the aftereffect of not having the capacity to totally exhaust your bladder. On the off chance that bladder stones are sufficiently little, they can go all alone with no detectable indications. In any case, once they get to be bigger, bladder stones can bring about incessant inclinations to urinate, excruciating or troublesome pee and hematuria.

  • Kidney Stones
  • Bladder Stones
  • Treatment
  • Surgery
  • Artificial Kidney
  • Diet for Stones
  • Transplant Research

Related Conference of Kidney Stones

May 14-15, 2018

19th Global Nephrologists Annual Meeting

Rome, Italy
June 8-9, 2018

3rd Annual Kidney Congress

Baltimore, USA
June 8-9, 2018

16th Annual Dialysis & Renal Medicine Conference

Baltimore, USA
June 28-29, 2018

20th World Kidney Congress

Berlin, Germany
July 23-24, 2018

15th World Nephrologists Meeting

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
July 23-24, 2018

14th World Nephrology conference

Melbourne, Australia
October 15-16, 2018

22nd European Nephrology Conference

Warsaw, Poland
November 19-21, 2018

International Conference on Nephrology

South Africa

Kidney Stones Conference Speakers

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